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Australian Indigenous

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  • A Theory for Indigenous Australian Health and Human Service Work

    A Theory for Indigenous Australian Health and Human Service Work

    by Lorraine Muller

    Lorraine Muller outlines a theory for professional practice with Indigenous clients in the human services, based on traditional Indigenous knowledge and spirituality. Most people of European background are not aware that they see the world through the lens of the Western tradition, but for Indigenous people, it can seem like a foreign language. Indigenous ways of thinking and working are grounded in many thousands of years of oral tradition, and continue among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people today. Lorraine Muller shows that understanding traditional holistic approaches to social...

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Volume 376

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Volume 376

    by Editor: Justin Healey

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples live about 10 years less than non-Indigenous Australians. Since 2006, the ‘closing the gap’ campaign has been pursued in collaboration between government and health, welfare and rights agencies to try and close the health and life expectancy gap within a generation. The health disadvantages experienced by Indigenous Australians are shaped by history and the broader social and economic conditions in which they live; progress has been slow and mixed. This book evaluates the progress made towards closing the gap. How can Indigenous outcomes be...

  • Aboriginal Narrative Practice: Honouring Storylines Of Pride, Strength And Creativity

    Aboriginal Narrative Practice: Honouring Storylines Of Pride, Strength And Creativity

    by Dulwich

    This book shares stories of creative inventions by Aboriginal narrative therapists and community workers, including the ‘Shame Mat’, the ‘Language Tree of Life’, ‘Conversations with Lateral Violence’, and ‘Narrative community gatherings’. These significant innovations are expanding the field of narrative practice, not only in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander contexts, but also across cultures and internationally. Significantly, this book also illustrates how narrative practices are being used by Aboriginal communities to decolonise identity stories, to move beyond mental health labels, and to step out of missionary rules and closets of shame. In...

  • Anger and Indigenous Men

    Anger and Indigenous Men

    by Edited by A Day, M Nakata & K

    This book is for social work and criminal justice practitioners who wish to develop culturally appropriate and effective programs for reducing anger-related violence perpetrated by Indigenous men. It places cultural context at the heart of any intervention, broadening the focus from problematic behaviour to a more holistic notion of well-being.  The book is structured in three parts. Part 1 explores Indigenous perspectives on anger and violence, on both sociological and psychological levels. The different views presented show there is no single “cause” but provide contexts for understanding an individual’s anger.  Part 2 outlines...

  • Cockatoo: My Life in Cape York

    Cockatoo: My Life in Cape York

    by Roy McIvor

    When Roy McIvor was a small boy, his people were taken from their mission home in Cape Bedford and exiled to Woorabinda Aboriginal Reserve more than 1500 kilometres away. Their lives were torn apart as they witnessed the death of more than a third of their people at Woorabinda and the internment of their beloved German missionary “Muni”. The removal of the Guugu Yimirthirrr people from Cape Bedford during World War II is a shameful yet seldom-told chapter in the history of Australia which remains unexplained to this day. Roy...

  • Forgotten War

    Forgotten War

    by Henry Reynolds

    *Winner of the 2014 Victorian Premier's Award for non-fiction!* Australia is dotted with memorials to soldiers who fought in wars overseas. Why are there no official memorials or commemorations of the wars that were fought on Australian soil between Aborigines and white colonists? Why is it more controversial to talk about the frontier war now than it was one hundred years ago? Forgotten War continues the story told in Henry Reynolds’ seminal book The Other Side of the Frontier, which argued that the settlement of Australia had a high level of...

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