Practice to make a difference.
  • The Ammuchi Puchi

    The Ammuchi Puchi

    by Sharanya Manivannan

    When Anjali and I were really little, we were sort of afraid of our grandmother, Ammuchi… Aditya and Anjali love listening to their grandmother’s stories, particularly the scary one about the ghost in the tree. But the night their grandmother passes away, all her stories seem to lose their meaning. Then something happens that is more mysterious and magical than any story. Could their grandmother still be with them after all? A poignant and moving story about bereavement and healing. Stunningly illustrated and told in gorgeous poetic prose. *Author Bio:* *Sharanya...

  • The Faraway Seed

    The Faraway Seed

    by Anna Boucaut

    A forest stood tall and proud, all its trees the same. One day a bird dropped a new seed in the forest and a different tree grew. Will the forest accept the new tree? With the theme being multiculturalism, acceptance and celebration of difference, this is the story of a little seed’s journey to acceptance against all obstacles laid out by the forest, eventually making the forest not so ‘perfect’ but very, very beautiful with its diversity and loveliness. This story is for all those who come from...

  • The Little Refugee

    The Little Refugee

    by Anh Do

    Anh Do's inspirational story about his family's incredible escape from war-torn Vietnam and his childhood in Australia, told especially for children. Giant waves crashed down on our little boat. I was terrified but my mum hugged me tight and told me, 'Everything will be okay. Don't worry, it will be okay.' Anh Do nearly didn't make it to Australia. His entire family came close to losing their lives as they escaped from war-torn Vietnam in an overcrowded boat. It was a dangerous journey, with murderous pirates and terrifying storms,...

  • We are all Born Free The Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Pictures

    We are all Born Free The Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Pictures

    by Amnesty International

    The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was signed on the 10th December 1948 as an enduring international commitment to human rights. It was compiled after World War Two to declare and protect the rights of all people from all countries. This beautiful collection, published 60 years on shows us that even the youngest child can understand why human rights are still of crucial importance. It reminds us how much they concern us all, young and old, all over the world. Adults as well as children will appreciate the artistic value...

  • Whoever You Are

    Whoever You Are

    by Mem Fox and Leslie Staub

    Every day all over Australia, children are laughing and crying, playing and learning, eating and sleeping. They may not look the same. They may not speak the same language. And their lives may be quite different. But inside, they are just like you. This story weaves its way across cultures and generations, celebrating the bond that unites us all.

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