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Robin and the White Rabbit: A Story to Help Children with Autism to Talk about their Feelings and Join In

In this tale we meet a child sitting alone, feeling unable to join in with the other schoolchildren having fun in the playground. Feeling frustrated and lonely, the child's emotions build up until they form a bubble around them, separating them entirely. Who can help the child?

Suddenly a White Rabbit appears who presents easy and playful ways to get the child to express their feelings. Each time the child says what they like and don't like, it helps to create a hole in the bubble, opening the child up to the wider world.

Through delightful illustrations and photographs, this picture book helps children who struggle with social isolation find a way to communicate with those around them. It can be read by children themselves or with adults as a learning tool, helping children learn to express their feelings through the use of visual communication cards.

Contents:

  • Foreword by Tony Attwood
  • Story

Author Bio:

Emma Lindström is a preschool teacher working with children with special needs.

Åse Brunnström has an Master of Education in Visual Arts and Design.

Review:

'Robin and the White Rabbit will enchant children with its delightful illustrations and sweet story of courage and friendship whilst giving educators a valuable tool to help children understand and express their thoughts and emotions.' - - Kathy Hoopmann: Author of All Cats Have Asperger Syndrome, All Dogs Have ADHD and All Birds Have Anxiety

'This charming book is a poignant reminder that children with Autism feel intensely, but are often unable to give voice to their feelings. The sadness and loneliness felt by Robin, resonates through the stark illustrations. We long to help, but are left floundering in the silence. Leading us on a journey from despair to joy, we are shown a way to unlock Robin's inner thoughts and feelings. A powerful therapeutic tool for young and old.' - - K.I.Al-Ghani Specialist Advisory Teacher, University Lecturer, Autism Trainer and International Author of books on ASD

'This will be extremely valuable information for parents and teachers, and will enable the child to use a new form of communication. The story also includes themes of friendship, encouragement and affection, and can be used to explain the world of autism to typical peers. The messages and implications of this book could be written in many hefty volumes. The great value of this little story book is its brevity, and eminent accessibility to adults and children alike.' - - From the foreword by Tony Attwood, The Minds and Hearts Clinic, Brisbane

'Touchingly simple and straightforward and all the more effective because of that, it's a gentle education for all of us - adults, siblings and youngsters on the spectrum - in the power of visual communication.' - - Brian Attwood, author of Make Your Own Picture Stories for Kids with ASD

Robin and the White Rabbit: A Story to Help Children with Autism to Talk about their Feelings and Join In

Author: E Lindstrom & A Brunnstrom

$24.99 Add to Cart

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